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Meranti's

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    Posted: 04 Oct 2014 at 5:41pm
Philippine Mahogany, The wood name Philippine Mahogany is a loose term that applies to a number of wood species coming from southeast Asia. Another common name for this wood is Meranti: while yet another name that is commonly used when referring to plywood made of this type of wood is Lauan. (And even though it’s called Philippine Mahogany, it bears no relation to what is considered to be “true” mahogany in the Swietenia genera.)

Scientifically, the name Philippine Mahogany has been used to encompass most commercial lumber found in the Shorea genus, where it is very commonly used in its native southeast Asia. There is an abundance of variety between the difference species: each with different working properties, appearances, and mechanical strength values.

The five main groupings for Philippine Mahogany (Meranti/Lauan) are:

Light Red Meranti, Suitable for lure making

Dark Red Meranti, NOT Suitable for lure making

White Meranti, Suitable for lure making

Yellow Meranti, Suitable for lure making

and Balau. NOT Suitable for lure making


 Light Red Meranti.

Scientific Name: Shorea spp.


Distribution: Southeast Asia

Average Dried Weight: 30 lbs/ft3 (480 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .40, .48

Colour/Appearance: Colour can be highly variable depending upon the species: ranging from a pale straw colour, to a darker reddish brown.

Grain/Texture: Has a coarse texture with medium to large pores. Grain is sometimes interlocked.

Workability: Typically easy to work, due to its low density. Though some rough or ragged surfaces may be left while sanding, and it may be necessary to sand up to a finer grit to obtain a satisfactory finish. Some species may have a slight blunting effect on tools due to small levels of silica present in the wood. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Odour: No characteristic odour.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Meranti in the Shorea genus has been reported to cause eye, throat, and skin irritation.

 

White Meranti.

Scientific Name: Shorea spp.


Distribution: Southeast Asia

Average Dried Weight: 37 lbs/ft3 (590 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .48, .59

Colour/Appearance: Heartwood is a pale yellowish-orange when freshly cut, aging to a golden yellow-brown.

Grain/Texture: Has a coarse texture with medium to large pores. Grain is sometimes interlocked. Contains a high level of silica: over .5% of dried weight.

Workability: White Meranti is in and of itself easy to work, but it has a very severe blunting effect on tools due to its high silica content, so carbide-tipped cutters are recommended. Also, interlocked grain can sometimes present problems during planing, and sawn/planed surfaces can be left fuzzy or ragged. Sanding to finer grits will help smooth the wood’s surface, and prepare it for a stain or finish. Glues well.

Odour: No characteristic odour.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Meranti in the Shorea genus has been reported to cause eye, throat, and skin irritation.

Yellow Meranti.

Scientific Name: Shorea spp.


Distribution: Southeast Asia

Average Dried Weight: 35 lbs/ft3 (565 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .44, .56

Colour/Appearance: Typically a yellow to yellow-brown, which tends to darken with age.

Grain/Texture: Has a coarse texture with medium to large pores. Grain is sometimes interlocked.

Workability: Typically easy to work, though any interlocked grain can present problems during planing. Some species may have a slight blunting effect on tools due to small levels of silica present in the wood. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Odour: No characteristic odour.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Meranti in the Shorea genus has been reported to cause eye, throat, and skin irritation.
"If you are going to have fun with your rod.. get some wood



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