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north american plugs.

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beer-breath View Drop Down
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    Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 5:39am
our more popular trolling plugs are all relatively similar, mainly with just different tow-point styles.
 
this is a bill norman.
he has different styles as well, the fat, stubbies also, and others that are more popular for casting for bass etc.
but this style is really popular on some of our lakes for trolling, especially in the winter months when the fish are more lethargic.
it has a great slow action and really gorgeous paint and finishes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote beer-breath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 5:46am
this is the luhr-jensen j-plug.
I think they have the greatest design for tow-point connections.
the plug itself runs free on the line when a fish is on.
what's great about that, is if a fish breaks the line, the plug then floats to the surface and isn't lost with the fish.
 
 
this is the hook set-up that runs through the hole in the lure, it can be changed to a single treble or single barbless like I do.
while trolling, it's pulled tight into the plug and acts like any other plug.
but, when a fish hits, the plug is then free to slide up the line out of the way while fighting the fish, and especially great about the design is the fact of no more lost lures.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CaptainCranky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 5:47am
That is a Norman lure I used to use way back for Tailor here in Aus.Not that colour though.Interesting setup with the hook.The Suicide or 92554 Mustad hook is certainly popular over your way for salmon .Thankyou for posting it up.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote beer-breath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 6:07am
and here's a couple others, made in Canada, right here in British Columbia.
the top is a tomic, originaly designed as a salmon lure.
they have a unique shape to their cup/face and also have a straighter, less erratic action.
and they are designed with a solid connection, a steel oval that runs through the lure.
these are plastic molded lures, which the others are as well.
 
the lower one is a lyman, and is a wooden lure.
they have a much more erratic action and are great for almost any fish, but really excel on rainbow trout.
but, being wood, the thing that I think is their biggest weakness, is their connections. they are simply screw eyes that are screwed into the wood, and can turn very easily by hand, being that the plug itself really just has a thin paint on it and almost unnoticeable finish, barely a gloss over the paint.
 
 
 
I have a big question for you guys, as you have lots of experience with serious fighting fish.
would that screw-eye connection be strong enough on those ocean fish that you's are catching?
obviously a through-design connection is best, but I am skeptical that a smallish screw-eye, and then into soft wood at that, would be the best.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote beer-breath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 6:49am
Originally posted by CaptainCranky CaptainCranky wrote:

That is a Norman lure I used to use way back for Tailor here in Aus.Not that colour though.Interesting setup with the hook.The Suicide or 92554 Mustad hook is certainly popular over your way for salmon .Thankyou for posting it up.
yeah, this is a "modified" one.
it's a set-up that has been found to work better.
they are modified and sold this way.
the front hook is moved forward to the tow point, and a hole is drilled into the body then rattle bb's are put inside and the hole is epoxied over.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote horrorhead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 8:47am
Those heart bibbed Bill Normans in silver or gold chrome are great on deep trolling for flathead.

I know of a lure maker who tested the screw in eyes, but still glued in. The larger ones opened up at 180 pounds, and the smaller ones at 120 pounds in a straight line pull with a scale and winch attached.

The top plug is a Silver Horde 3 inch. Correspondence with them said that they broke the mold more then 13 years ago and won't be making anymore as they were not a big seller. 
The next plug was sold as a "Silver plug" but is not a Silver Horde.
The next wooden plug was used by my father in New Guinea. Any idea what this is? It is pretty generic in shape.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote beer-breath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 9:41am
the second is a  "tomic" lure.
made on Vancouver island.
a friend has piles of the silver hordes, but I think he got most of them on ebay.
 
not sure what the bottom wood plug is.
agree, it's pretty much the generic plug shape.
 
 
so, 120 and 180 lbs of pull to open, that's pretty solid I would say.
how is that would you think for big ocean fish?
I would think the screw-eye would pull from the wood before it opened.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote horrorhead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 11:14am
Thanks for that Beer-BreathThumbs Up

There is still a (smaller) hole drilled that he fills with araldite, then he screws in the eyelets. When you see what fish are caught on 30/40/50 pound line and up like below- 80 pound line is far lighter then the 120 pounds that the lighter eyelet pulled in a straight line. A fighting fish would pull at different changing angles so that might lessen the rating to straighten them. A sudden impact of a hitting fish may also lessen the amount of pull needed.    
But ultimately, as long as the screw eye has been glued in I do not have a problem with these being used in lures.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote beer-breath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Apr 2015 at 12:30pm
them are absolutely monster fish.
I agree, if the eye-screws are glued in or epoxied like mine, they definitely would never pull free.
I was just skeptical because I heard those lures started getting marketed to the big ocean fisherman and I laughed a little.
I just don't see them being built to high enough standards for real fish like big tuna and such.
a little eyelet simply screwed into soft wood just wouldn't cut it in my opinion. especially when they are practically loose right from the factory.
 
but, with good drags and lots of water to play a fish, it can be amazing what size of things can be caught on surprisingly smaller gear.
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